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Tech & Science


Discover Magazine: Technology

  • With 3D-Printed Bacteria, This Bionic Mushroom Turns Light Into Electricity
    "Power mushrooms” sounds like something out of Super Mario, but a lab in New Jersey has made them a reality.Hoping to create a new source of renewable energy (and to test out some ideas), a team at the Stevens Institute of Technology engineered a…
    - 8 days ago, 7 Nov 18, 11:06am -
  • Mining Cryptocurrency Uses More Energy Than Actual Mining For Metals
    Mining cryptocurrency uses more energy than conventional mining of copper or platinum and at least as much as mining gold finds new research published today in the journal Nature Sustainability. The digital currencies aren’t helping climate change…
    - 10 days ago, 5 Nov 18, 7:26pm -
  • Meet the Biochemist Engineering Proteins From Scratch
    Biochemist David Baker changed the study of proteins — now he's changing the proteins.
    - 16 days ago, 30 Oct 18, 6:00am -
  • Why China's Artificial Moon Probably Won't Work
    To step outside on a moonlit night is to see the darkness pushed back. The reflected sunlight from our natural satellite during a nearly full moon is enough to limn the nighttime landscape in silver and allow even human eyes to penetrate the gloo…
    - 20 days ago, 26 Oct 18, 5:00pm -
  • The Road to Self-driving Cars Is Full of Speed Bumps
    Automakers are revving up for a very near future of fully autonomous vehicles. But the road ahead is rough.
    - 21 days ago, 25 Oct 18, 6:00am -
  • How Wasps Taught These Drones to Pull Harder
    Drones, in the sense of remote controlled flying vehicles, are pretty neat pieces of technology. Even just the various models available for consumers can covertly provide surveillance, offer novel rescue and transportation options and even create hig…
    - 22 days ago, 24 Oct 18, 2:22pm -
  • New Tech to Predict When Food Spoils Could Slash Waste
    In August 2011, a can of Great Value peas joined the nonperishables in my pantry, one of several panic purchases as Hurricane Irene barreled toward my home on the northeast US coast. But the emergency passed, and the can, with its unassuming blue-on-…
    - 24 days ago, 22 Oct 18, 9:00pm -
  • How Mantis Shrimp Punch So Hard
    Mantis shrimp — four-inch long seafloor crustaceans — knock out prey with a punch that accelerates faster than a .22 caliber bullet. Now, researchers have figured out exactly how the tiny stomatopods wind up their forceful blows. It’s all thank…
    - 28 days ago, 18 Oct 18, 5:23pm -
  • 20 Things You Didn't Know About ... Lasers
    They’ve won a lot of Nobels, helped detect lost cities and chronicled the drift of the moon.
    - 29 days ago, 17 Oct 18, 6:00am -
  • CRISPR Can Make Old Tomatoes, New Tomatoes
    It’s a big week for CRISPR! Despite being a world apart, two separate research groups had the same idea: to see if CRISPR gene editing can really mimic conventional plant breeding.One group re-domesticated a wild tomato plant; the other used a si…
    - 42 days ago, 4 Oct 18, 5:15pm -

Geek.com

npr: Research

PBS: Science & Technology

  • Can failure actually improve innovation?
    Innovators rarely travel a straight path to arrive at a new idea. Failure — lots of failure — often paves the way. At least eight out of every 10 new consumer products that enter the market will fail, according to one estimate. That can be frus…
    - 11 Sep 15, 4:17pm -
  • Trove of fossils from a long-lost human ancestor is greatest find in decades
    Watch Video | Listen to the AudioGWEN IFILL: Researchers announced a fossil discovery today that some consider one of the greatest in the last 50 years, and one that could provide an important link in the family tree for all humans.Jeffrey Brown has…
    - 10 Sep 15, 6:25pm -
  • Dwarf planet Ceres seen in mesmerizing new detail
    This image taken by NASA’s Dawn spacecraft, shows Occator crater on Ceres, home to a collection of intriguing bright spots. Image by NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDANew images of dwarf planet Ceres show oddly shaped mountains, collapsed crater wa…
    - 10 Sep 15, 3:51pm -
  • Cave divers uncover new humanlike species in South Africa
    Skeleton of the newly discovered Homo naledi. Courtesy of eLife 2015;4:e09560.Paleontologists have discovered an ancient human relative in South Africa thanks to a tricky cave diving excavation that recovered close to 1,550 fossils buried 100 feet u…
    - 10 Sep 15, 11:40am -
  • Rupert Murdoch’s 21st Century Fox buys National Geographic media
    James Murdoch, CEO of 21st Century Fox Inc., pauses during a panel session at the Cannes Lions International Festival Of Creativity in Cannes, France, on June 25, 2015. 21st Century Fox and National Geographic announced it would expand its partnersh…
    - 9 Sep 15, 4:04pm -
  • Can Alzheimer’s proteins be spread via medical procedures?
    This computer artwork shows the brain’s neural network represented by lines and flashes. A new study indicates Alzheimer’s markers in the brain may have been spread via a protein. Photo by Alfred Pasieka/Science Photo Library and Getty ImagesFro…
    - 9 Sep 15, 1:26pm -
  • Can Denmark make energy demand follow renewable supply?
    Watch Video | Listen to the AudioJUDY WOODRUFF: The nation of Denmark has been a pioneer in wind energy production. Last year, nearly 40 percent of its electricity came from wind power, and, by 2050, it’s set an ambitious goal of having renewable e…
    - 7 Sep 15, 6:25pm -
  • Sea turtles deliver record nesting seasons in Southeast U.S.
    A loggerhead sea turtle hatchling. This summer’s hatching season has hit new records alongside the Southeast United States coast. Photo by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Southeast Region.Sea turtles have delivered a nesting season for the record b…
    - 7 Sep 15, 4:57pm -
  • Why humanity is essential to the future of artificial intelligence
    Watch Video | Listen to the AudioJUDY WOODRUFF: Now another new addition to the NewsHour Bookshelf. Tonight’s focus is the brave new world of artificial intelligence. Jeffrey Brown has that. JEFFREY BROWN: Is it man against or with machine? Do m…
    - 4 Sep 15, 6:20pm -
  • Did wolves help restore trees to Yellowstone?
    Photo by Arthur Middleton/University of Wyoming/Via U.S. Geological SurveyTwenty years on from their reintroduction into Yellowstone National Park, wolves are still howling. But does their presence spell good or bad tidings for other wildlife?“Si…
    - 4 Sep 15, 3:30pm -

Phys.org: Feature Stories

  • newHemimastigotes found to represent a major new branch on evolutionary tree of life

    Hemimastigotes found to represent a major new branch on evolutionary tree of life

    A team of researchers at Dalhousie University has found evidence that suggests hemimastigotes represent a major new branch of evolutionary life. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes their genetic study of the dirt-dwell…
    - 2 hours ago, 15 Nov 18, 9:20am -
  • newStudy of rock samples suggests Campi Flegrei could be re-entering a new phase of pressure buildup

    Study of rock samples suggests Campi Flegrei could be re-entering a new phase of pressure buildup

    A team of researchers from ETH Zürich, Cardiff University, Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia and Sapienza-Università di Roma has found evidence that suggests Campi Flegrei could be re-entering a phase of pressure buildup. In their pape…
    - 3 hours ago, 15 Nov 18, 9:10am -
  • newOrangutan mothers found to engage in displaced reference

    Orangutan mothers found to engage in displaced reference

    A pair of researchers with the University of St Andrews has observed orangutan mothers engaging in displaced reference after observation of a perceived threat. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, Adriano Lameira and Josep Call d…
    - 3 hours ago, 15 Nov 18, 8:48am -
  • Stretchable thermoelectric coils for energy harvesting in miniature flexible wearable devices

    Stretchable thermoelectric coils for energy harvesting in miniature flexible wearable devices

    Miniaturized semiconductor devices with energy harvesting features have paved the way to wearable technologies and sensors. Although thermoelectric systems have attractive features in this context, the ability to maintain large temperature difference…
    - 1 day ago, 14 Nov 18, 9:30am -
  • How birds and insects reacted to the solar eclipse

    How birds and insects reacted to the solar eclipse

    A team of researchers with Cornell University and the University of Oxford has found that birds and insects reacted in some surprising ways to the 2017 U.S. total solar eclipse. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the group descr…
    - 1 day ago, 14 Nov 18, 9:23am -
  • Studying Komodo dragons to better understand reduced dispersal in island species

    Studying Komodo dragons to better understand reduced dispersal in island species

    A team of researchers from Australia, Indonesia, Italy and Denmark has learned more about Komodo dragons in their search to better understand reduced island dispersal in island species. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B,…
    - 1 day ago, 14 Nov 18, 9:14am -
  • Zoologist outlines how humans have altered evolution over past century

    Zoologist outlines how humans have altered evolution over past century

    Zoologist Sarah Otto, with the University of British Columbia, has published a report in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B regarding human influence on evolution over the past century. She notes that the number of changes that have occur…
    - 1 day ago, 14 Nov 18, 8:30am -
  • Giant flare detected on a pre-main sequence M star

    Giant flare detected on a pre-main sequence M star

    Using the Next Generation Transit Survey (NGTS), astronomers have identified an energetic flare displaying quasi-periodic pulsations on the pre-main sequence M star NGTS J121939.5-355557. The newly detected flare is one of the most energetic flares s…
    - 2 days ago, 13 Nov 18, 9:10am -
  • Long-term study shows atmospheric biome fluctuates by season

    Long-term study shows atmospheric biome fluctuates by season

    A team of researchers with the LTER Environmental Monitoring Observatory in the Aigüestortes National Park in Spain has found that there is seasonal variation in atmospheric microbes. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy o…
    - 2 days ago, 13 Nov 18, 8:40am -
  • Dark matter 'hurricane' offers chance to detect axions

    Dark matter 'hurricane' offers chance to detect axions

    A team of researchers from Universidad de Zaragoza, King's College London and the Institute of Astronomy in the U.K. has found that a "dark matter hurricane" passing through our solar system offers a better than usual chance of detecting axions. In t…
    - 2 days ago, 13 Nov 18, 8:30am -

Smithsonian: Technology & Space

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The Economist: Science & Tech

  • newThe kilogram and three other metric units are about to be revamped

    The kilogram and three other metric units are about to be revamped

    THROUGHOUT MUCH of human history, man has been the measure of many, if not all, things. Lengths were divided up into feet, palms, spans and smaller units derived from the human hand. Other measures were equally idiosyncratic. Mediterranean traders…
    - 53 mins ago, 15 Nov 18, 10:49am -
  • newThe Swiss invent a novel watch spring

    The Swiss invent a novel watch spring

    The mechanical side of timeDIGITAL ELECTRONICS has transformed many consumer-goods industries, but analogue niches survive and even thrive. Vinyl records have staged a comeback, sales of printed books have been growing faster than e-books in some…
    - 53 mins ago, 15 Nov 18, 10:49am -
  • newA newly discovered tea plant is caffeine-free

    A newly discovered tea plant is caffeine-free

    THE WORLD loves a cuppa. Even though it takes just a few grams for a brew-up, some 3m tonnes of tea are consumed every year. And tea can be good for you, as it contains compounds that help to lower cholesterol and reduce the risk of cardiovascular…
    - 53 mins ago, 15 Nov 18, 10:49am -
  • newThe Philippines wants big companies to accept responsibility for a devastating typhoon

    The Philippines wants big companies to accept responsibility for a devastating typhoon

    Picking up the pieces“IAGONISE WAITING for the word for the fate of my very own relatives… I speak for the countless people who will no longer be able to speak for themselves after perishing from the storm.” With these words, Yeb Sano, the…
    - 53 mins ago, 15 Nov 18, 10:49am -
  • A new robot system will reopen abandoned, flooded mines

    A new robot system will reopen abandoned, flooded mines

    Teeth in its head and a sting in its tailTHE IDEA of underwater mining is not restricted to the ocean floor (see article). High water tables submerge many terrestrial deposits, too. At minimum, this means doing a lot of pumping to make them worka…
    - 8 days ago, 7 Nov 18, 3:33pm -
  • Town-dwelling spiders are not afraid of the light

    Town-dwelling spiders are not afraid of the light

    Lover of the lightMOST SPIDERS avoid light because, besides being predators, they are also potential prey. But there is a set of circumstances in which living beside a powerful light is an advantage. This is when you are a web-weaving spider. Mot…
    - 8 days ago, 7 Nov 18, 3:33pm -
  • To get to the top of the art world, start there in the first place

    To get to the top of the art world, start there in the first place

    WELL BEGUN, half done. That proverb, ascribed to Aristotle, seems an apt description of the art market—at least it is if a study of artistic careers, published this week in Science, is to be believed. In this study Albert-László Barabási, a p…
    - 8 days ago, 7 Nov 18, 3:33pm -
  • Mining the deep ocean will soon begin
    DIVA AMON, a researcher at the Natural History Museum in London, spotted her first whale skull in 2013, during an expedition to the Clarion Clipperton Zone (CCZ) in the tropical Pacific. It sat on beige silt, some 4,000 metres beneath the sea’…
    - 8 days ago, 7 Nov 18, 12:59pm -
  • Kepler, RIP

    Kepler, RIP

    IT USED TO be that finding even one new planet was enough to make an astronomer’s career. Uranus was discovered in 1781 by William Herschel, who these days has, among other things, space telescopes, asteroids, schools and a street in Paris named…
    - 14 days ago, 1 Nov 18, 12:40pm -
  • Making trains run on time

    Making trains run on time

    IT IS A myth that, whatever his faults, Benito Mussolini, dictator of Italy in the 1920s, 1930s and 1940s, made the trains run on time. He didn’t. If even a man with dictatorial powers cannot enforce a railway timetable, what hope is there in a…
    - 14 days ago, 1 Nov 18, 12:40pm -

USA Today: Tech

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A curated aggregation of musings from across the land and of different subject matters for the scanoholics.