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Pathology & Medicine


British Medical Journal

  • newColleagues are best source of support for doctors facing complaints, researchers find

    Colleagues are best source of support for doctors facing complaints, researchers find

    Doctors facing a complaint have lower levels of depression and anxiety if they seek support from their colleagues, research published in BMJ Open has shown.1UK and Belgian researchers concluded that...
    - 14 hours ago, 22 Nov 17, 12:11pm -
  • newChancellor’s {pound}2.8bn NHS cash pledge will not ease pressures, leaders warn

    Chancellor’s {pound}2.8bn NHS cash pledge will not ease pressures, leaders warn

    The NHS in England will receive an additional £2.8bn (€3.16bn; $3.72bn) from the government over the next two years to invest in frontline services, the chancellor of the exchequer has announced.In...
    - 15 hours ago, 22 Nov 17, 11:11am -
  • newDifficult behaviour can protect patients

    Difficult behaviour can protect patients

    Discussing medical malpractice, Sokol says, “Insight can be defined as the ability to understand intellectually and emotionally why a behaviour is wrong.”1Insight cannot be defined in such a...
    - 15 hours ago, 22 Nov 17, 10:56am -
  • newFrench surgeon is struck off after “actively disengaging from the regulatory process”

    French surgeon is struck off after “actively disengaging from the regulatory process”

    A French orthopaedic surgeon, whose registration with the General Medical Council was suspended for practising in the UK without a licence, has been struck off after he stopped responding to...
    - 15 hours ago, 22 Nov 17, 10:50am -
  • newAdam Kay: Mirth partner

    Adam Kay: Mirth partner

    bmj;359/nov22_1/j5227/FAF1faDuncan SmithBiographyAdam Kay, 37, is a doctor who left medicine to become a comedy performer and scriptwriter—interests he combined in This is Going to Hurt, a book about...
    - 21 hours ago, 22 Nov 17, 5:02am -
  • Janet McLelland

    Janet McLelland

    bmj;359/nov21_10/j5270/FAF1faJanet McLelland (“Jan”) grew up in Newcastle. She was a research fellow at the Royal Postgraduate Medical School, where she completed her MD thesis, “Studies Relating to...
    - 2 days ago, 21 Nov 17, 7:51am -

Diagnostic Pathology

Discover Magazine: Health & Medicine

  • newBe thankful for your gut microbes this Thanksgiving

    Be thankful for your gut microbes this Thanksgiving

    By: Daniel McDonaldWhile you kick back and relax after your Thanksgiving dinner,  your gut microbiota – the collection of beneficial microbes, mostly bacteria, that inhabit your lower intestine – will be hard at work breaking down the food yo…
    - 9 hours ago, 22 Nov 17, 5:42pm -
  • newHow Breathing Links Mind and Body

    How Breathing Links Mind and Body

    Whether it’s regulating a burst of anger or calming down a bout of anxiety, taking a deep breath can have a potent effect.There are compelling hints that controlled breathing can improve overall physical wellbeing, but the neurophysiology — th…
    - 12 hours ago, 22 Nov 17, 2:12pm -
  • newHappy Thanksgiving!

    Happy Thanksgiving!

    Ben KreckxAll of us at SciStarter want to thank you for learning about, sharing, or engaging in science. You inspire us. Thank you.Below, you'll find a cornucopia full of Thanksgiving-themed citizen science projects. Gobble 'em up!Cheers!…
    - 13 hours ago, 22 Nov 17, 12:56pm -
  • PTSD: An Overlooked Consequence of a Cancer Diagnosis

    PTSD: An Overlooked Consequence of a Cancer Diagnosis

    Roughly one in five cancer patients struggle with post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in the aftermath of diagnosis and treatment.A recent study from Malaysia indicates that PTSD is a fairly common result of the long and difficult process of liv…
    - 1 day ago, 21 Nov 17, 5:13pm -
  • The Opioid Epidemic Hits Some Generations Harder Than Others

    The Opioid Epidemic Hits Some Generations Harder Than Others

    As the opioid epidemic rages in the U.S., the number of overdose deaths has nearly quadrupled since 1999. And according to a new study, baby boomers and millennials are at significantly higher risk.Researchers from Columbia University analyzed dr…
    - 1 day ago, 21 Nov 17, 4:00pm -
  • A First Attempt to Edit Genes Inside the Body

    A First Attempt to Edit Genes Inside the Body

    For the first time, doctors have attempted to edit a man's genes inside his body.The patient is 44-year-old Brian Madeux, who suffers from a rare genetic disease that has left him progressively more debilitated over the course of his life. His li…
    - 7 days ago, 15 Nov 17, 5:50pm -
  • Even Pills Are Going Digital

    Even Pills Are Going Digital

    Not following medicine as prescribed can be costly — like $100 billion to $289 billion, as reported by The Atlantic in 2012. Not only that, but it can also harm patients and set back their treatment.But a new digital pill could change that.The…
    - 7 days ago, 15 Nov 17, 5:38pm -
  • Signatures of Alzheimer's Disease Discovered in Dolphins

    Signatures of Alzheimer's Disease Discovered in Dolphins

    A team of scientists in the United Kingdom and the U.S. recently reported the discovery of pathological signs of Alzheimer’s disease in dolphins, animals whose brains are similar in many ways to those of humans.This is the first time that these s…
    - 8 days ago, 15 Nov 17, 2:17pm -
  • Is Cannabis an Effective Sleep Aid?

    Is Cannabis an Effective Sleep Aid?

    If you speak to someone who has suffered from insomnia at all as an adult, chances are good that person has either tried using marijuana, or cannabis, for sleep or has thought about it.This is reflected in the many variations of cannabinoid or cann…
    - 13 days ago, 10 Nov 17, 11:27am -
  • The CRISPR Antidote

    The CRISPR Antidote

    Scientists hacked the machinery of cellular warfare to splice genes. Now they’ve found a way to guard against it, too.
    - 13 days ago, 10 Nov 17, 7:00am -

FDA: MedWatch Safety Alerts

Medical News Today

Medicine Journal

  • newEditorial Board

    - 8 days ago, 30 Nov 17, 7:00pm -
  • newContents

    - 8 days ago, 30 Nov 17, 7:00pm -
  • Self assessment/CPD answers
    Question 1
    - 3 days ago, 19 Nov 17, 7:00pm -
  • Staphylococcal and streptococcal infections
    Correct answer: B. As there is growth in both sets of cultures, it is very unlikely that this is a contaminant. Given the clinical context, Staphylococcus aureus is the most likely organism.
    - 13 days ago, 9 Nov 17, 7:00pm -
  • Lyme disease
    Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne illness in the USA and Europe. Pathogens involved are Borrelia burgdorferi in the USA and B. afzelii and B. garinii in Europe. The characteristic rash of erythema migrans occurs in approximately 75% of patie…
    - 25 days ago, 28 Oct 17, 8:00pm -
  • Emerging infectious diseases
    The spectrum of human pathogens and the infectious diseases they cause is continuously changing through evolution, selection and changes in the way human populations interact with their environment and each other. New human pathogens often emerge or…
    - 26 days ago, 27 Oct 17, 8:00pm -
  • Staphylococcal and streptococcal infections
    Staphylococci and streptococci are leading causes of healthcare and community-acquired bacterial infections worldwide. Within each genus, virulent species such as Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus pneumoniae are associat…
    - 26 days ago, 27 Oct 17, 8:00pm -
  • Botulism and tetanus
    Botulism and tetanus are diseases caused by neurotoxins produced by Clostridium botulinum and Clostridium tetani, respectively. The bacteria and the toxins they produce are closely related. Both diseases are rare in the UK and the developed world, bu…
    - 27 days ago, 26 Oct 17, 8:00pm -
  • Extrapulmonary tuberculosis
    Extrapulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB) now represents over half of all diagnosed cases of TB in the UK and is increasingly seen in patients with immunosuppression or HIV. It is usually caused by reactivation of latent infection and can cause disease at a…
    - 27 days ago, 26 Oct 17, 8:00pm -
  • Adenovirus infections
    Adenoviruses are endemic, primarily causing respiratory and ocular (pharyngoconjunctival fever) symptoms and gastroenteritis in infants and children. They also cause epidemic keratoconjunctivitis, pneumonia in military recruits and severe, life-threa…
    - 27 days ago, 26 Oct 17, 8:00pm -
Emergency Comeback
Emergency Comeback
Emergency Comeback
Emergency Comeback

NLM: General Announcements

Sci American: Infectious Diseases

Sci American: Medical Technology

The Guardian: Medical Research

  • Sugar industry withheld research effects of sucrose 50 years ago, study claims
    Researchers say negative health impacts of sucrose could have been combated sooner had research been released – but industry bodies dispute the findingsSugar’s demise from childhood staple to public enemy can be seen everywhere. Chocolate bars ar…
    - 1 day ago, 21 Nov 17, 2:41pm -
  • Britain’s diminished role after the Brexit vote | Letters
    Alex Orr, Elaine Bagshaw, Peter Lyth and others look at Britian’s future after BrexitIn recent days the UK’s standing in the world has further diminished as the impacts of Brexit become more tangible. Earlier this week the relocation of two EU ag…
    - 2 days ago, 21 Nov 17, 1:30pm -
  • Francis Crick Institute's £700m building 'too noisy to concentrate'
    Some of the 1,250 people working at the year-old laboratory say its open plan layout, designed to produce collaboration, makes it hard to focus on workIt is a £700m cathedral to biomedical science, where scientists work together to make breakthrough…
    - 2 days ago, 21 Nov 17, 1:18pm -
  • Owning a dog cuts risk of heart attacks and other fatal diseases, study shows
    Health benefits of a pet dog are greatest for those who live alone, lowering the risk of dying from cardiovascular disease by 36%, say scientistsNever mind the chewed slippers, the hair on the sofa, and the inexplicable barking at 3am. Having a dog i…
    - 6 days ago, 17 Nov 17, 5:20am -
  • Primodos pregnancy test report criticised as 'whitewash' by MPs
    Politicians question report that found no evidence hormonal pregnancy tests taken in 1960s and 1970s caused birth defectsMPs have attacked a report into controversial hormone pregnancy tests including Primodos as “a whitewash, an injustice, a betra…
    - 7 days ago, 16 Nov 17, 7:18am -
  • Rare genetic mutation found in Amish community could combat ageing
    Discovery of mutation which appears to protect against biological ageing raises hopes for new treatments to prevent age-related disorders The discovery of a rare genetic mutation that prolongs human life has raised hopes for new treatments to combat…
    - 8 days ago, 15 Nov 17, 2:00pm -
  • Scientists make first ever attempt at gene editing inside the body
    New therapy will permanently alter DNA, with no way to alter mistakes editing may cause – but offers chance to tackle currently incurable metabolic diseasesScientists have tried editing a gene inside the body for the first time, in a bold attempt t…
    - 8 days ago, 15 Nov 17, 7:33am -
  • Thomas Keneally: death is not the fly in the cosmic ointment. It is the cosmic ointment
    Life is strong in people – we didn’t get to be wreckers of the planet without a mighty life force in us. But accepting death is one of the contentments of ageWhen I was 16, I was given a wonderful anthology, Poetry of the English-Speaking World,…
    - 12 days ago, 10 Nov 17, 4:52pm -
  • Study AI: 'I believe we could see the end of cancer in our lifetime'
    PhD research student Sam Cooper, from Imperial College London, explains how artificial intelligence is helping to improve the way we treat cancerExamining images and data is time-consuming and relies on the judgement and skills of highly specialised…
    - 13 days ago, 10 Nov 17, 11:33am -
  • Miscarriage research: the bioengineers taking a fresh look at pregnancy
    With the help of CGI models of placentas, universities are collaborating to investigate why one in five pregnancies end in miscarriageFor an engineer, Dr Michelle Oyen has spent a lot of time with placentas recently. “It’s a really weird organ, h…
    - 13 days ago, 10 Nov 17, 11:32am -
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About PopMuse

A curated aggregation of musings from across the land and of different subject matters for the scanoholics.